Air Quality Programs

The DVRPC region does not meet federal air quality standards for ground-level ozone and particle pollution. The Clean Air Act requires DVRPC to demonstrate that projects and programs in the TIP and Long Range Plan do not cumulatively harm air quality. DVRPC also administers the Air Quality Partnership and the Ozone Action program. The Partnership is a public-private coalition that educates the public about the health effects of air pollution and what can be done to reduce pollution levels.


Air Quality Conformity

Transportation conformity is a federally mandated, analytical process through which Metropolitan Planning Organizations [MPOs] must demonstrate that the transportation investments, strategies and programs they choose have air quality impacts consistent with those contained in the State Air Quality Implementation Plan [SIP] for achieving the National Ambient Air Quality Standards [NAAQS] and that emissions do not exceed the SIP targets ("budgets") for emissions from mobile sources.

Air Pollution

Air pollution comes from many types of engines, industries, and commercial operations. Pollution sources that move, such as trucks, snow blowers, bulldozers, and trains, are known as "mobile sources." Examples of all other (non-mobile) sources of air pollution include power plants, factories, and manufacturing processes. Learn more about how mobile sources contribute to four significant air pollutants and how these pollutants affect human health and the environment.

Air Quality Partnership

The Air Quality Partnership is a coalition of private companies, government agencies and non-profit organizations dedicated to raising awareness of air quality in the Delaware Valley and promoting actions that people and organizations can take to reduce air pollution and protect public health.

Alert Newsletter

Alert is a monthly newsletter produced by DVRPC's Department of Air Quality Planning.